Rita — Life is

Saturday, May 7, 2016

[Prior to this entry, I wrote of a friend, “Chris and I talked for an hour last night. I hope he finds that his way clears.”]

F: 6:30 a.m. Rita, do we talk this morning?

R: You can see that your view of life has moved along to a different perspective. Partly this is from having younger friends, partly it is from having a longer view. Neither way do you see life only as you saw it when young.

F: No. Time does bring us that, doesn’t it? We may not be intrinsically wiser, but we can at least remember other viewpoints, and can compare.

R: It is like that once you are no longer confined to the 3D, only with greater freedom to move viewpoint. In one sense, you are remembering, just as may be in the 3D, but more you are reliving, rather than remembering, and even more than that you might be said to be living, rather than merely re-living. You are there with the initial intensity, yet the “you” that is there is deeper, wider, more enduring, more extensive, than the 3D version of you that was there at the time.

F: That isn’t quite what you mean. I could feel the slippage at the end of the sentence.

R: Yes, but the slippage wasn’t carelessness in choosing words (on your part) or in elucidating concepts (on our part, or my part, however you want to see it), but in the interface between 3D and non-3D understanding. That is, it is a translation difficulty.

F: Worth pursuing?

R: In all this business, remember the concept of opportunity costs.

F: I never forget it. Doing one thing necessarily involves not doing all the other things one might have done otherwise.

R: One might say the All-D or the non-3D aspect of All-D is free from opportunity costs, in a way, because the very concept assumes the tyranny of an ever-moving present moment. “Carpe diem” isn’t a slogan where the moving moment doesn’t have to be seized.

F: But when you deal with 3D, our side has its opportunity costs, always.

R: Very true. That is one aspect of continuous choosing, of course. If there were no ever-moving present moment, your necessity to choose could be so far deferred as nearly not to exist – and that difference in urgency is another difference between 3D and non-3D.

F: I think that we in our 3D environment find it hard to visualize what we call eternal life. We unconsciously either assume more or less the same conditions we experience here, or we envision things as being different beyond our ability to conceptualize. “There is no time on the other side,” for instance.

R: You read somewhere, and it stuck with you, that “eternity” does not mean “a very long time,” but a different thing entirely.

F: Yes, but what that different thing is and what it amounts to is a very different thing entirely. I mean, sure, eternity is not an endless string of days like today (or like any days) but then, what is it? Even with the vague sense of time as the equivalent of geography, upon which we can walk in different directions once we are in non-3D, rather than being frog-marched as in 3D, that doesn’t give us much to chew on, mentally. Hard to use our 3D-born imaginations to envision non-3D conditions.

R: Then use your non-3D experiences and concepts!

F: Use our intuition, you mean.

R: That is what you do use. Try to remember that your mind and spirit remain in non-3D even while you function in 3D. It isn’t a matter of them moving over to non-3D upon your physical death, although language continually leads you to think of it that way. The only reason you can get anything from the concepts you get from non-3D is because your non-3D component already knows all this!  The only reason you don’t get it more easily is because your 3D component fights it, distrusts it, tries to translate it to “make sense” of it.

F: That’s an interesting take on the situation.

R: Well, does it resonate?

F: It does, but that doesn’t mean I can exactly “get” it.

R: Well, consider it as you live your life, and see. It will either burrow deeper into your mental fabric or it won’t. It will prove helpful and productive, or it won’t.

F: So talk to us more about “eternal life.”

R: That is all we have been talking about! It is all there is to talk about! Life is eternal, which is to say little more than “the fabric of the universe is the fabric of the universe.” Cryptic, I realize, but it is in cryptic sayings that one sometimes outwits the 3D limitations on one’s (non-3D, after all) mind. Logic can organize; it can never reliably construct. To get at non-3D realities, logic is never enough. It is like trying to describe a sphere’s properties using plane geometry.

F: “What can’t be said, can’t be said, and it can’t be whistled, either.”

R: No. But it can be pointed to, and of course that is what the guys did for us in 2001-2002, and what I’m doing with you now, and what anybody and everybody does in connecting to guidance on an on-going basis.

“Eternal life” does not mean only (or anyway need not mean only) life once you’re through with the 3D. It doesn’t even mean “life once the bundle that is presently `you’ has been selected and set to motion in 3D.”

Life – are you ready for this? – is. Consciousness is. Everything that exists, 3D, non-3D, both considered together – is. It exists. It changes and yet remains what it is. It develops, complexifies, degenerates, simplifies, permeates and yet separates, permutates and yet endures. Life, I repeat, is.

F: Hence, despite appearances, all is well.

R: Correct.

F: So what are we doing here?

R: You and me? All our mental community? Everybody? Everybody and everything? We’re all – being.

F: Is there a point to it?

R: Is there a point to a sunset, or a sunrise?

F: There are lots of points to either, or both, symbolic and actual.

R: Correct.

F: Hmm. This calls for more coffee.

R: What is the point of coffee? It has physical effects you enjoy, and it is a symbol for many things, depending upon who is doing the symbolizing – but what is the point of coffee?

F: I’ll let you know after I refill my cup.

[Coffee]

R: And the answer is?

F: The answer is, it’s part of the world, to be enjoyed if you wish or let alone if you wish.

R: And can be used and misused and can have good and bad effects, and isn’t for everybody but is for some, and in all this it isn’t something to make a religion of, or a cult of, or even a philosophy.

F: In other words, it’s part of life and leave it alone, looking for ultimate definitions.

R: In other words, life is, and your (anyone’s) trying to bound it is a mental exercise but is not a meaningful task.

F: I think that means, it may be worthwhile to make the attempt, but the attempt can never succeed per se.

R: The contents of a box cannot easily comprehend the box itself, let alone whatever exists beyond the box’s exterior.

F: So have we been wasting our time here?

R: Is it not worth something to know what cannot be done, as well as what can? Is it not worthwhile to hone your understanding, and learn by comparing various viewpoints? Just because you can’t have the moon doesn’t mean you can’t have the benefits of reaching for the moon.

F: Well – Charles is going to be disappointed.

R: Many people are going to be disappointed, but maybe they ought to consider changing their appointments!

F: Say some more about that?

R: Suppose you take for granted that life is, and that you cannot work your way to a definition of its meaning. That doesn’t leave you bereft. At least, it need not. It leaves you free to live.

F: Without worrying about consequences, you mean?

R: No, I mean you work out the meaning of your life – which is your only responsibility, hence your only real possibility – by living it. So, knowing this, you may feel freer to live as you wish, as you are prompted to live, and this will automatically provide you the way.

F: All is well, all is always well.

R: That’s what they told us and that’s how it proved to be. You are not smarter than the universe. You are not more moral, more careful, more sensitive, more anything. Neither are you responsible for helping the sun to rise in the morning sky. In your world, all is well and your day waits for you to fill it.

And enough for the moment.

F: Great stuff, Rita. Our thanks as always.

 

5 thoughts on “Rita — Life is

  1. Echoing Mark’s comment, I find this passage powerful.

    “Suppose you take for granted that life is, and that you cannot work your way to a definition of its meaning. That doesn’t leave you bereft. At least, it need not. It leaves you free to live.

    … you work out the meaning of your life – which is your only responsibility, hence your only real possibility – by living it. So, knowing this, you may feel freer to live as you wish, as you are prompted to live, and this will automatically provide you the way.

    All is well, all is always well.

    … you are not smarter than the universe. You are not more moral, more careful, more sensitive, more anything. Neither are you responsible for helping the sun to rise in the morning sky. In your world, all is well and your day waits for you to fill it.”

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