The perils of consuming “news”

This excellent article from The Guardian spells it out. My own experience confirms what the author says. Oddly, when you stop paying attention to what is called news, you realize, there really wasn’t much there. Certainly no analysis, certainly no consideration of long-terms effects or present term context.

(And at this point, I can imagine someone saying, “But what about National Public Radio?” To which, I’d respond, “Well, what about The Guardian, or the Christian Siience Monitor?” But even the exceptions aren’t entirely exceptions. The hazards of external rather than internal focus remain. I gave up listening to NPR years ago, and I must say, I don’t miss it.)

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2013/apr/12/news-is-bad-rolf-dobelli

Fascinating find

A propos of nothing, but fascinating.

Don’t be put off by the usual headline-hype. In this case, it’s almost accurate. Wonderful photos.

http://www.thedailyberries.com/scientists-just-found-deep-ocean-seriously-unbelievable-im-still-shock/

http://www.thedailyberries.com/scientists-just-found-deep-ocean-seriously-unbelievable-im-still-shock/

Rudolph Steiner on documentary evidence and the past

Reliance on History

Extremely interesting Steiner quote

In the astral world everything exists as a picture reflected in a mirror

Austrian podcast about Colin Wilson, with Colin Stanley and Gary Lachman

Begin at about minute 14.

https://www.spreaker.com/user/thothermes

Rudolf Steiner on the abolition of the spirit in the West

Certainly true about communism. Mao tse-tung told the young Dalai Lama, “Religion is poison.” But Marxists are not the only ones denying spirit. In effect, so does much of organized religion and virtually all of the commercial and cultural establishment. You can see how wonderfully well we are doing without it.

The abolition of the spirit

Mr. Jefferson and friends

A morning walk this morning at nearby Monticello with Simon and Michelle, at the end of their current visit to Charlottesville.

Simon Hay, Michelle Buss, Mr. Jefferson, and unknown distinguished stranger

Simon and me on the walking trail